30 Day Health Challenge

How To Make The Next 30 Days Really Count In Your Efforts to Get In Shape




Have you ever read something that you knew could be helpful to you but then did nothing with the material? Can’t you see that just reading and making plans is not enough? Below, we will talk about the power of a 30 day health challenge, accountability partners and/or support groups, and journaling.

30 Day Health Challenge. You can make significant progress, if you develop habits that help you eat a little better and exercise a little wiser. If you consciously do something because it serves your “WHY” (click here and study #1 for more information on a “WHY Statement)  for 30 consecutive days, you will be well on your way to having a habit.

30 Day Health Challenge

30 Day Health Challenge

For example, with your eating, if you currently eat about two servings of vegetables a day, you can choose to eat three servings a day for the next 30 days. If you drink about one glass of water a day, you can choose to drink two glasses of water a day for the next 30 days.

With your exercising, if you have no workout routine, you can choose to walk 10 minutes a day for the next 30 days. You can choose to learn about “assisted pushups” (i.e., google it) and do two sets of five on Monday, Wednesday, and Friday for the next 30 days.

By the time you get to the end of the 30 days, you will be well on your way to eating more vegetables, drinking more water, walking, and doing some resistance training.

If the examples above are too low for you, start with more advance choices. If the examples are too difficult, start even lower. The idea is to start somewhere and build from there.

When the 30 days is up, try to raise the bar and do another 30 day challenge. Raise the bar enough for you to feel challenged but not so high that it is discouragingly difficult.

Accountability Partners and/or Support Groups. An accountability partner is simply a person who provides support and encouragement to you, as you carry out your 30 day health challenge. It can be a spouse, friend, or a co-worker. However, the best partners are those who are doing the 30 day challenge with you.

Encourage those who may be willing to be your partner to get their FREE –  How To Get In Shape After 40 – book and join you with the challenge. For their FREE copy of this book, please refer them to http://gettinginshapeafter40.com/how-to-get-in-shape-after-40-2/.

This person should be a source of positive energy, not someone who discourages you from staying focused. Nor should they be someone who will make you feel too bad, if you fall short a few days in the challenge.

A support group is a group of three or more people who support and encourage one another in carrying out the 30 day challenge. You can find your own support group members or simply join our Face Book group.  Click here to go to https://www.facebook.com/groups/455354451337411/?ref=br_tf.

Just introduce yourself and share with us what you feel comfortable sharing. You can simply let us know which day you are on and your determination to finish your 30 day challenge.

Or you can let us know more details about your challenge like what eating or exercising habits you are working on. When joining the group, it is important to try to put in more than you take out. You put in by “liking” the posts, sharing something inspirational, and encouraging others in the group.




Journaling. The main idea is to make a daily entry of some type every day for 30 consecutive days. You can make the entry on a document in your phone, in a hand written notebook, or in a fancy journal book. You can write as much or as little as you think best serves what you are trying to do.

My personal strategy is to list about three mindset, eating and exercising habits that I am committed to developing and then put an “X” next to them at the end of the day, if I have completed them or an “O,” if I have not completed them. I add a few bullet notes about any significant positive or negative events of the day (if any) and any adjustments I need to make (if any). Some people call this an accountability log.

You can always add on to your journal habits. Make your first 30 day challenge relatively easy to complete and add on from there. Click here for a sample of a tracking from.

Habits Verses Weight Loss Focus. I strongly recommend that you focus on healthy habits at least “more than” weight loss goals. You have more control and much quicker feedback when you are tracking habits than when you track weight loss. For example, you can get daily feedback about are you eating enough vegetables and doing enough walking. However, you don’t normally lose significant weight every day.

So challenge yourself to develop some habits that help you with having a healthy mindset, eating, and exercising. Healthy habits will help you develop a healthy weight. But trying to keep a healthy weight without healthy habits is almost impossible.

Here are some examples of healthy habits. Modify the habits, so they fit your situation. I recommend that you track 12 habits or less, so it can be manageable.

Healthy Habits for Beginners

Mindset

M. 1. Write your WHY Statement and SMART Goals (click here and read #1 and #2 to learn more about WHY Statements and SMART Goals) and then review them at least three times a week.

M. 2. Make a journal entry at least three times a week about how you are coming with your habits.

M. 3. Try to find an accountability partner who you can be accountable to at least once a week.

M. 4. Check in with the “Getting In Shape After 40” group at least two times a week – let us know how you are doing, share some encouragement with the group, and enjoy the encouragement of others.

Eating

Ea. 1. Spend 10 minutes a day for three days a week learning your macronutrient requirements and start developing some meals that satisfy the requirements. Click here for a great article to start with.

Ea. 2. Eat at least three servings a vegetables or fruits a day.

Ea. 3. Drink at least one liter of water a day.

Ea. 4. Avoid or lessen the amount of sugar added foods and drinks at least three days a week.

Exercising

Ex. 1. Spend 10 minutes a day for two days a week reading some material on resistance, cardio, and flexibility exercises. Click here for a great article to start with.

Ex. 2. Walk at least 20 minutes a day for three days a week.

Ex. 3. Do at least three sets of wall assisted pushups (5 reps per set) two days a week.

Ex. 4. Do some basic stretches for 10 minutes two days a week.

Healthy Habits for Intermediates

Mindset

M. 1. Write your WHY Statement and SMART Goals (click here and read #1 and #2 to learn more about WHY Statements and SMART Goals) and then review them at least five times a week.

M. 2. Make a journal entry at least five times a week about how you are coming with your habits.

M. 3. Find an accountability partner who you can be accountable to at least once a week.

M. 4. Check in with the “Getting In Shape After 40” group at least three times a week – let us know how you are doing, share some encouragement with the group, and enjoy the encouragement of others.

Eating

Ea. 1. Spend 10 minutes a day for three days a week learning about your macronutrient requirements and developing seven breakfasts, lunches, dinners, and snacks that satisfy the requirements. Click here for a great article to start with.

Ea. 2. Eat at least three servings of vegetables a day.

Ea. 3. Drink at least two liters of water a day.

Ea. 4. Avoid or lessen the amount of sugar added foods and drinks at least five days a week.

Exercising

Ex. 1. Spend 10 minutes a day for two days a week reading some material on resistance, cardio, and flexibility exercises. Click here for a great article to start with.

Ex. 2. Walk at least 50 minutes a day for three days a week (include some jogging, if you can).

Ex. 3. Do at least three sets of sets of full body resistance exercises two days a week.

Ex. 4. Do some basic stretches for 15 minutes two days a week.

So, if you do the 30 day healthy habit challenge with an accountability partner, support group, and journaling, you will be pleasantly surprised by how much progress you can make in reaching your goal. When you put a few “30 day health challenges” together, you have a quarter. Put a few quarters together, and you have a year. And at some point you have a changed and healthy life style!


 

 

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Story of Daphene Baines

Daphene Baines – Some Highlights
From My Health Story




Daphene Baines running the 2015 Queen Bee half marathon in Cincinnati, Ohio

Daphene Baines running the 2015 Queen Bee half marathon in Cincinnati, Ohio

Hello, my name is Daphene Baines. I was born in 1966, and at this point, I believe that I am in decent shape. I am 5 feet 2 inch tall and weigh less than 150 pounds. I work on having a peaceful mindset, healthy eating, and getting enough exercise.

I am a runner, and I like to run 6 miles at least two days a week. Once a month, I like to do a long run. This is an 8 to 13 mile run on an early Saturday morning. I normally lift weights twice a week.

At my worse …
In 1989, I gave birth to my youngest daughter. When I went back to the doctor for my six week checkup, I weighed in at 289 lbs. (what a bummer). Like my husband (Robert), my greatest challenges at that time were poor eating and not enough exercising. I didn’t eat a lot of fried foods, but I loved my candy. If you are a GenXer you probably remember penny candy. Yes, there was a time when candy only cost one penny. I ate almost every kind of candy that stuck to your teeth. I also failed to eat vegetables and rarely drunk water. My breakfast consisted of a pack of “white powered” mini donuts and a 16 ounce bottle of orange juice.

Easter 1993 (size 20) Half Marathon 2015 (size 8)

What got my attention …
My husband said in his story that “I never looked terribly fat too myself.” That’s what I said about myself also. In fact, my husband did not give me any indication that I was so overweight (he is so lovable). In 1989, the doctor told me my pressure was out of control. I said, “Okay,” but did not do anything except take my medicine. My body was a mess.

Daphene Baines in 1989

Daphene Baines in 1989

I went back to school and discovered that I could hardly walk to my class from my car. That inspired me to get serious about my weight. Over the next few years, I went from a size 26 to a size 18/20. Still thought I was cute and I became comfortable with that weight. I became more conscious of my food selections when my oldest daughter gave up red meat at the age of 10 and Ricky Allen highlighted I ate too much candy. I lost more weight through my conscious food selections and exercising with step aerobics and dancing (Rose Alexander). I worked my way to a size 16 and stayed there for a few years.

My current attitude and actions …
Today, being healthy is very important to me. I believe that my body belongs to God, and I should respect it. I also have two beautiful daughters that admire me and are witnessing my transformation (I am still changing). I work with many clients as a personal trainer, fitness instructor, and health coach. They look to me for guidance.

The following are some of the key parts of my daily eating habits: I drink at least two and a half liters of water, try to eat at least five servings of vegetables, eat a combination of carbohydrate and protein about every three hours, and try to keep my carbs intake under 180 grams a day.

The following are some of the key parts of my weekly exercise routine: I run two and sometimes three days a week, power walk one hour a week, do a full-body resistance routine two days a week, two full-body stretch routines.

My loves, fears, and hates …
I would love to have good health and live to see my 80th birthday. I love being in positive relationships, enjoying my family, and being a companion to my wonderful husband.

I fear the people I love becoming sick due to unhealthy choices.

I hate the idea that people use artificial items to appear healthier (i.e., clothing items that make you appear a few sizes smaller), instead of doing the work to becoming healthier. I hate that all health insurances don’t pay for gym memberships.

As you can see, I am just an ordinary gal trying to live a healthy life. I replaced a life of a 289 pounds, size 26, and candy driven person with a 145 pound, size 8, and oatmeal eating person. Those that know me are probably clapping, because they know I have food texture issues – smile. I want to share my knowledge and experience with others, as I journey to get and stay in shape after 40.

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Story of Robert Baines

Robert E. Baines, Jr. – Some Highlights From My Health Story




My name is Robert Baines, I was born in 1966 and am in pretty good shape today. I am 6 feet 1 inch tall, weigh about 222 lbs, with a waste of about 36 ½ inches. I have a good diet, exercise regularly, and work on keeping a health conscious mindset.

At my worse …
I weighed in at 250 lbs in 2010 (i.e., 43 years old). My greatest challenges at that time were poor eating and not enough exercising. I ate too many simply carbs, not enough vegetables. My water intake was too low. My favorite junk foods were Snickers candy bars, ice cream, pizza, Doritos, sweet potato pie, peach cobbler, fried chicken, friend fish, and diet Mountain Dew pop (smile).

Robert's Story

Robert’s Story

I walked about 30-45 minutes a day for three days a week. I probably had an average heart rate of 70% of my maximum heart rate. I did bench presses once or twice a week. I remember being about to bench my weight 7 to 10 times at my maximum.

During this time I suffered from acid reflex and some sleep apnea. I remember feeling sluggish (i.e., low in energy) on a number of occasions.

What got my attention …
I never looked terrible fat too myself. But when I weighed in during my annual doctor visit at 250 lbs., I felt almost embarrassed by the number. I reasoned within myself that if I add just one pound a year, by the time I reached 60, I would weigh around 270 lbs. This was absolutely unacceptable.

I do remember my father telling me that I was too big. But I dismissed that as his being too critical, since no one else was saying the same.

I had a young man in my church (Ricky Allen) who inspired me to be more health conscious. And of course the health consciousness of my wife (i.e., a certified personal trainer and nutrition coach) played a key role in helping me to focus.

When my father died of prostate cancer and multiple myeloma at the age of 64 (i.e., 2011), I really decided that I needed to focus in on my health.




My current attitude and actions …
Today, I am focused on healthy eating and exercising for at least the following three reasons: 1. It brings glory to God who gave me this body with which to serve Him; 2. I want to be able to enjoy my retirement; and 3. I want to be able to be an active grandparent with my grandchildren.

The following are some of the key parts of my daily eating habits: I drink at least three liters of water, eat at least five servings of vegetables, eat carbs and protein about every three hours, and limit simply cabs.

The following are some of the key parts of my weekly exercise routine: I do a full-body dumbbell and pushup routine three days a week, two 45 minute high/low cardio interval routines and a 1 hour power walk, and two full-body stretch routines.

My loves, fears, and hates …
I would love to make it to age 80 in good health, be around to see my grandchildren do well with their lives, and enjoy traveling around the world.

I fear that cancer, injury, diseases, and additives to my food are beyond my control.

I hate the idea that there are those who add unhealthy items to my food for the sake of profit. I hate the idea that my children and grandchildren may not be as health conscious as I am. I hate to see how unhealthy eating is often cheaper than healthy eating, which makes obesity and health issues more prevalent among the poor.

So, as you can see, I am not an elite athlete. I am a health conscious middle aged man who is on a journey aimed at seeing good health at the age of 80+ and want to share his wisdom with others.

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